Publications

2019
Jowett N, Kearney RE, Knox CJ, and Hadlock TA. 1/1/2019. “Toward the Bionic Face: A Novel Neuroprosthetic Device Paradigm for Facial Reanimation Consisting of Neural Blockade and Functional Electrical Stimulation .” Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 143, 1, Pp. 62e-75e. Publisher's VersionAbstract

BACKGROUND:

Facial palsy is a devastating condition potentially amenable to rehabilitation by functional electrical stimulation. Herein, a novel paradigm for unilateral facial reanimation using an implantable neuroprosthetic device is proposed and its feasibility demonstrated in a live rodent model. The paradigm comprises use of healthy-side electromyographic activity as control inputs to a system whose outputs are neural stimuli to effect symmetric facial displacements. The vexing issue of suppressing undesirable activity resulting from aberrant neural regeneration (synkinesis) or nerve transfer procedures is addressed using proximal neural blockade.

METHODS:

Epimysial and nerve cuff electrode arrays were implanted in the faces of Wistar rats. Stimuli were delivered to evoke blinks and whisks of various durations and amplitudes. The dynamic relation between electromyographic signals and facial displacements was modeled, and model predictions were compared against measured displacements. Optimal parameters to achieve facial nerve blockade by means of high-frequency alternating current were determined, and the safety of continuous delivery was assessed.

RESULTS:

Electrode implantation was well tolerated. Blinks and whisks of tunable amplitudes and durations were evoked by controlled variation of neural stimuli parameters. Facial displacements predicted from electromyographic input modelling matched those observed with a variance-accounted-for exceeding 96 percent. Effective and reversible facial nerve blockade in awake behaving animals was achieved, without detrimental effect noted from long-term continual use.

CONCLUSIONS:

Proof-of-principle of rehabilitation of hemifacial palsy by means of a neuroprosthetic device has been demonstrated. The use of proximal neural blockade coupled with distal functional electrical stimulation may have relevance to rehabilitation of other peripheral motor nerve deficits.

2018
Wenjin Wang, Sung Kang, Iván Coto Hernández, and Nate Jowett. 12/2018. “A Rapid Protocol for Intraoperative Assessment of Peripheral Nerve Myelinated Axon Count and its Application to Cross-Facial Nerve Grafting.” Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Donor nerve myelinated axon counts correlate with functional outcomes in reanimation procedures, however there exists no reliable means for their intraoperative quantification. Herein, we report a novel protocol for rapid quantification of myelinated axons from frozen sections, and demonstrate its applicability to surgical practice.

METHODS:

The impact of various fixation and FluoroMyelin Red™ staining strategies on resolved myelin sheath morphology from cryosections of rat and rabbit femoral and sciatic nerves was assessed. A protocol comprising fresh cryosection and rapid staining was developed, and histomorphometric results compared against conventional osmium post-fixed, resin-embedded, toluidine blue-stained sections of rat sciatic nerve. The rapid protocol was applied for intraoperative quantification of donor nerve myelinated axon count in a cross-facial nerve grafting procedure.

RESULTS:

Resolution of myelinated axon morphology suitable for counting was realized within ten minutes of tissue harvest. Though mean myelinated axon diameter appeared larger using the rapid fresh-frozen as compared to conventional nerve processing techniques (mean ± standard deviation; rapid, 9.25 ± 0.62; conventional, 6.05 ± 0.71; p < 0.001), no difference in axon counts was observed on high power fields (rapid, 429.42 ± 49.32; conventional, 460.32 ± 69.96; p = 0.277). Whole nerve myelinated axon counts using the rapid protocol herein (8435.12 ± 1329.72) were similar to prior reports employing conventional osmium processing of rat sciatic nerve.

CONCLUSIONS:

A rapid protocol for quantification of myelinated axon counts from peripheral nerves using widely available equipment and techniques has been described, rendering possible intraoperative assessment of donor nerve suitability for reanimation.

Nate Jowett. 10/2018. “Corneal Neurotization by Great Auricular Nerve Transfer and Scleral-Corneal Tunnel Incisions for Neurotrophic Keratopathy.” British Journal of Ophthalmology.
Nate Jowett. 10/2018. “A General Approach to Facial Palsy.” Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America, 51, 6, Pp. 1019-1031. Publisher's Version 1-s2.0-s0030666518301221-main.pdf
I. Coto Hernàndez, C. Knox, S. Mohan, and N. Jowett. 7/2018. “Setting up a Super-Resolution Microscopy Facility.” In Microscopy Science: Last Approaches on Educational Programs and Applied Research.
Jacqueline J. Greene, Joana Tavares, Diego Luis Guarin, Nate Jowett, and Tessa Hadlock. 6/2018. “Surgical Refinement Following Free Gracilis Transfer for Smile Reanimation.” Annals of Plastic Surgery, 81, 3.
S. Mohan, I. Coto Hernández, W. Wang, K. Yin, C. Sundback, U. Wegst, and N. Jowett. 6/2018. “Fluorescent reporter mice for nerve guidance conduit assessment: A high-throughput in vivo model.” Laryngoscope.
Joseph Dusseldorp, Diego L. Guarin, Martinus M. Van Veen, Nate Jowett, and Tessa A. 2018. “In the Eye of the Beholder: Changes in Perceived Emotion Expression after Smile Reanimation.” Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.
Jacqueline J. Greene, Joana Tavares, Diego L. Guarin, Nate Jowett, and Tessa Hadlock. 2018. “Position and Bulk Refinement Following Free Gracilis Transfer for Smile Reanimation.” Annals of Plastic Surgery.
Jowett N, Kearney RE, Knox CJ, and Hadlock TA. 2018. “Toward the bionic face: A novel neuroprosthetic device paradigm for facial reanimation comprising neural blockade and functional electrical stimulation.” Plast Recon Surg .
I. Coto Hernández, L. Lanzano, M. Castello, N. Jowett, G. Tortarolo, A. Diaspro, and G. Vicidomini. 2018. “Improving multiphoton STED nanoscopy with separation of photons by LIfetime Tuning (SPLIT).” Proceedings SPIE. Link to WebsiteAbstract

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D. Guarin, J. Dusseldorp, T. Hadlock, and N. Jowett. 2018. “A Machine Learning Approach for Automated Facial Measurements in Facial Palsy.” Jama Facial Plastic Surgery. Link to WebsiteAbstract

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